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Job interview mistakes you need to avoid..Antal Recruiters tell you how.

Before you head into your next job interview, you need to prepare yourself if you want to be seriously considered for the position, you must prepare carefully. One or two missteps can disqualify you as a candidate, even if you have the right experience and skills. Interview mistakes (even if they are miniscule in nature according to you) can sometimes devastate your chances of getting the job.

Job interview mistakes you need to avoid... Antal Recruiters tell you how.

We spoke to 5 Antal India Recruiters and have listed – Job interview mistakes that will guarantee you don’t get hired

Casual approach towards the interview or overconfidence during an interview: According to Prajakta Dixit, Consultant, Antal International Pune, candidate’s casual approach towards the interview puts him/her on the radar. This mostly comes from a laidback attitude or could also be due to over confidence.  She explains “very often candidates have a casual approach towards interviews, they have the “been there done that” attitude and hence they don’t prepare and lose focus on the gravity of interview. This misapprehension seals their fate and they lose out of a great career opportunity. Prajakta advices saying, “candidates must treat every interview as if it’s their first ever interview and this is their one and only chance to sell themselves. Being overconfident and not preparing or for that matter being too laidback can harm their chances of cracking the interview”

Failing to prepare for every round: Titikshu Radhey, Senior Consultant, Antal International Jaipur explains that most candidates sometimes fail to prepare for every round. He says, “candidates prepare on the basis of which round of interview it is and who is interviewing them. They fail to realize that one should be prepared for every interview round – whether the first round or the final one. Every meeting is important irrespective of who is meeting you. It could be the HR, Line Manager or the Managing Director, being prepared for the interview shows your passion for the specific role and the company, and that’s what you will be judged on. He suggests that it’s good to find out who you are meeting, researching a bit about them on LinkedIN.  Preparing thoroughly may also help calm your nerves, You get confidence from competence.

 Not doing research on Company:“It’s important to know the role you are being interviewed for. However, it is equally important to know about the company you are being interviewed at.”, says Spandana Marchaya, Consultant, Antal International Bengaluru. She further adds, “Prepare yourself by reading about the company’s background, values, mission statement. Google the company to understand what the media is writing and perceives about the company” If you haven’t researched you won’t have any knowledge about the products, services, future plan, competitions, challenges and this will be evident during the course of the conversations. Doing your homework about the company will help you sell yourself better and you will get a clarity on how you can add value to the role and the company’s future goals.”

Not asking questions during an interview: “An interview is a two-way conversation, an opportunity for you to highlight your experience to the interviewer and ask them relevant questions to get more clarity on the role and understand their expectations as an employer” says Rahul Goyal, Principal Consultant Antal International Lucknow. He goes on to explain, saying, “If things are to proceed forward positively, both the parties are to be on same page and should be content with each other. The quality of questions, or lack of them, help managers gauge the candidate’s interest for a position. Not asking questions is perceived to be a lack of interest in the role and the organization.” He further explains, “Just as bad as not asking any questions is asking the wrong questions. During the initial interview, asking questions only about salary, company policies, benefits, etc. are not received well and shows that the candidate is only interested to move for personal benefits and doesn’t have a real motivation to change jobs.  It’s also in the candidate’s interest to evaluate the employer based on the answers and determine if they fit into the culture and will be able to grow professionally with the organization.”

Presenting yourself professionally: According to Dipti Puranik Team Leader Antal International Pune,” The first impression has a strong influence in making the hiring decision. Even if your resume looks great, being shabby for an interview can hamper your chances of getting the job. It’s important to look presentable regardless of what the company’s dress code is – formal or casual. Wear clothes that make you feel comfortable and confident. She takes her point further saying, “This also means going beyond your clothing, it means choosing your words carefully, being polite, being mindful of your body language, not fidgeting with your phone or watch, not interrupting while the interviewer speaks etc.”

To conclude we would like to remind you if you’ve got yourself an interview, it’s not enough to have an impressive resume. You’ll also need to know how to conduct yourself correctly to ensure you make a good impression.

If you are looking for a career change you can connect with our recruiters on LinkedIn and explore your next career move. To know more about us visit www.antal.com  For more interesting articles on career advice, jobs and franchise opportunities follow our LinkedIn page

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Serving notice period? You may land a Counter-offer

 

Times Of India April 20, 2019, Page 17

Are Job Hopping candidates bad for your company?

Are Job Hopping candidates bad for your company

With the evolving job market trends, we are currently seeing an increase in shorter job stints, we are already witnessing an increasing trend of replacement hiring. Today, millennials constitute a substantial share of the workforce. The job market is now attuning to their needs and we are witnessing a sweeping change in the way corporates functions. Hiring trends, work cultures, HR policies are all being shaped to accommodate the millennial workforce.

One such trend is ‘job-hopping’, which has been on a rise because millennials don’t subscribe to the idea of staying in one company for decades and corporates are adjusting to this new trend. However, not many HR managers subscribe to the idea when it comes to positions at the mid and senior level.

Candidates whose resume show a couple of ‘job hops’ in quick succession are scrutinized with suspicion. There is misconception around candidates who jump jobs frequently, it’s assumed that they are impulsive in decision making. There’s too much debate and contrasting views involved in hiring such a candidate. There are times when hiring managers simply refuse to even consider such a candidate for an interview.

This brings me to think whether short stints on a candidate’s resume reflect his ability, skills or caliber? Do short job stints mean the candidate is not able to deliver or he/she lack skills? Do longer tenures affirm that the candidate is good at their job or are reliable or an asset to the company?

In the West, people are hired on a contractual basis, even at the mid and senior level. Some for 2 years, 18 months or even 4 months. Does that mean these candidates are not proficient or do not possess average skills? Or have not contributed to their roles?

According to a report by Business Insider, here’s how long the average employee stays at the biggest tech companies:

  • Uber was at the bottom of the list, with a short average employee tenure of just 1.8 years.
  • At Dropbox, the average employee stays for 2.1 years.
  • Tesla employees stay at the electric car maker for 2.1 years on average,
  •  Facebook, a 2.5 year stint is the average whereas Airbnb its 2.6 years
  • At Netflix employees stay for an average of 3.1 years, to be exact.
  • An average employee tenure at Alphabet, the parent company of Google, is 3.2 year.

Does this mean that these individuals won’t get hired because they chose to move jobs too soon?

Another research shows that one tends to grow 18 to 20% more as an external hire as compared to growing within the same organization or due to a promotion. An individual could be part of an organization for 6 -7 years but may not have moved roles or on the other hand, there could be an individual who has moved 3 jobs in 2 years but has had a great career growth trajectory,  which one would you want to consider for the role you are hiring?

Notion that job hoppers are not as efficient is fast becoming antiquated. The truth is employees change jobs because they are offered better opportunities. They are ambitious and hence choose roles that allow them to continuously learn, develop, and advance in their careers. They build skills faster when they change companies because of the learning curve. These pointers are indicators of good talent.

One needs to think, and wonder if stability is directly proportionate to competency? In sectors where there is a dearth for good talent with niche skill sets; its best to hire good candidates despite their frequent job switches. In such scenarios, companies should utilize their diverse skill set and focus on their knowledge gaps to transform them into better leaders for their company’s benefit. Managers should focus on hiring for skills, attitude, competency, productivity, efficiency rather than job stability.

Candidates will continue looking for career opportunities that are exciting, competitive and not just sustaining. In a competitive and candidate-driven market, they are willing to experiment and take the risk for roles that challenge them. As the years go by shorter job stints or “job hopping” as we know it, will no longer be considered as forbidden. The stigma around it will quickly become a thing of the past and the sooner we accept this the better talent we hire.

Is video interviewing an effective screening tool for recruiters?

In the war for talent, accurate assessments of candidates and positive evaluations of interviewers are essential. Candidates who evaluate their interviewers more positively are more likely to accept a job offer. While modern technology has provided organizations with a slew of communication tools such as Skype, FaceTime and Google Hangouts that are used to recruit talent, nothing beats an in-person interaction, especially for the middle- and top-level jobs.

According to a study by Degroote School of Business at McMaster University in Ontario, applicants who were interviewed using video conferencing were less likely to get the job compared to the ones who underwent in-person interviews. Often, the resumes and the cover letters are written in a very formal manner, not providing much insight into the candidate’s personality. A personal Face-to-Face (F2F) interview is essential for gaining a good understanding of a candidate’s personality and motivation, which are key factors in predicting his or her success potential.

 

Video interviews are, of course, helpful when it comes to mass screening. They are particularly useful in assignments where a lot of the candidates, especially remote candidates, meet the basic requirements on paper and screening down to a few finalists would require a lot of interviews. But remember, as a recruiter you still have to go through all those videos to figure out the right candidate. Besides, a not-so-great internet connection can play havoc with the process. The candidates’ tech-savviness might also influence your impression even though it may not be directly related to the job, thus putting the candidate at a disadvantage. On the flip side, it puts less pressure on the candidates and allows them to communicate in a much more open fashion.

Besides, organizations don’t really save time with video interviews compared to telephone interviews or in-person interviews, except for the transportation time (on the candidate’s side). Another supposed benefit is that video interviews save recruiters the hassle as they help in sorting through the candidates faster. But, recruiters will still have to set apart time to listen and watch the interview videos. While recruiting for the middle or the top level, asking for a video interview can send a wrong signal to the candidates as it might mean that the company does not want to bother meeting people.

Additionally, it is also easy to become distracted whilst on video interviews and give the interviewer the wrong impressions. For example, the temptation to watch the little box at the bottom can give interviewer the impression that you lack confidence and sincerity. Looking into the camera will create the illusion of direct eye-contact, which is always a huge contributing factor in a F2F interview.

Video interviews are dehumanizing the interview process and while it may strike a chord with the millennial generation who have grown up with such applications, many mid and senior-level professionals still prefer the human touch. Cyberspace is a non-committed area of reality where you only have the facts and figures to guide you. People can be any kind of persona there and not show their true, authentic side. It works the other way too. When a candidate comes to your office, they too get an impression of you. How does the place look? Is the environment modern and clean? Does it look like it has a conducive atmosphere for reaching excellence? Bring in the candidates and give them the tour of the office, take them through multiple rounds and maybe a lunch. This would allow for multiple opinions on the candidate formed by various colleagues and provides a more wholesome picture about whether the candidate will be the right fit for the company.

F2F interviews allow for more in-depth data collection and comprehensive understanding and gives the interviewer more room to probe for explanation of responses. It allows the candidate to build a rapport with the interviewer, which will in turn help the latter pick up body language cues and facial expressions. This is more difficult in a video interview. An in-person interview is the best form of screening for the final decision-making round, particularly for the mid- and senior levels because as a recruiter you want the candidate to have the right culture fit. The DeGroote researchers found that candidates who were interviewed via video conferencing were rated lower by interviewers and were less likely to be recommended for hiring. Interestingly, even candidates rated their interviewers as less attractive, personable, trustworthy and competent.

F2F also makes it easier for the candidate to seek more answers to their queries or clarify questions that seemed confusing. Interviewers are able to connect with the candidates and show more empathy. When the candidates feel understood, they let their guard down, open up and share emotions.

One of the oldest forms of market research, F2F still holds good in this age of advanced technologies simply because there are inherent aspects, features and possibilities in a F2F interview that cannot be captured or replicated by any other method. That is why it is vital the talent acquisition function doesn’t lose the human touch. Recruitment, after all, is about finding the right person for the job who will be dependent on human relationships and intuition. At Antal International, we believe that enjoying the best of both worlds is key to successful talent acquisition.

Losing great candidates citing relocation constraint? Here’s how you can avoid it

Whether it is a high profile tech company like Infosys or Wipro or an established conglomerate like the Tatas, companies are having a hard time to keep the best and the brightest in the house. With millennial employees willing to relocate for a better job, HR has its job cut out. A recent survey found that young adults under the age of 35, senior executives, business owners, and unmarried adults are likely to consider relocation.

But, organizations need to evaluate how they can balance their relocation incentives with employee desires in order to fill key skill gaps. A failed relocation assignment doesn’t do anyone any good. It’s expensive and disruptive. And what might have started out as a positive experience could lead to a very unhappy employee or the loss of an employee.

HR needs to look beyond financial incentives to entice employees to relocate, underlining the need for companies to include alternatives in their relocation programs. Here are some of the factors to keep in mind while wooing outstation candidates:

Salary: When candidates consider relocation, they are not just looking for a hike in their salary. There will be compensation differences between cities depending on their Cost of Living Index. They become more pronounced when the candidate has to make the move from a Tier-II to Tier-I city, especially if they own a house where they live in. The double whammy of home loan EMIs and rent can take a toll and therefore these factors play a role in the candidate’s decision to join a company. It is important that the HR considers these important factors before they provide a salary offer: Cost of living differences, quality of living standards, benefits in new location etc. Show that you are willing to negotiate the salary, while emphasizing the company’s benefits and other perks such as flexible working hours, transportation facilities, training and development opportunities and paid time off.

Relocation Assistance: Moving homes especially to a new city is not an easy task especially when you have a family, children or your elderly parents living with you. One of the first things that a candidate who’s looking to move to another city will seek is relocation assistance. They will expect the company to cover expenses such as packing and moving, storage of belongings for a period of time, short-term lodging in the destination city, cost of moving vehicle, finding a home in the destination city etc. Keep these factors in mind while designing the relocation assistance. If your company does not provide relocation assistance, you could consider offering candidates a one-time joining bonus to take care of such expenses. You may also help them find a home quickly in the new city by introducing them to property dealers/agents etc. Moving to a new city isn’t easy and the relocation package will provide the candidate everything they need to know about the company’s culture.    

Spousal Income: Organizations hoping to encourage employees to accept outstation assignments should consider an individual’s personal and professional situations from a holistic perspective. There will be a disruption in the household income level and also a discontinuity in the spouse’s career due to the relocation over a period of time. Spousal dissatisfaction, adjustment, and issues associated with his/her career development are the most common reasons for relocation failure. While no company has contractual obligation to provide spousal income, he/she plays an important role in the success of that job. Hence, it is in the company’s best interests that the HR addresses the spousal income issue. You can help by providing job search assistance, or introduce them to other employees who made the move as well; the new connections could help them find a job quicker. Put them in touch with networking resources or organize events and activities to make them feel more involved.

Provide Cost of Living Context: Cost of living is the amount of money it takes to sustain a certain level of living, including basic expenses for goods and services such as housing, transportation, food, clothing and household goods. We would recommend that the HR factors in the cost of living into the salary for the said location, before offering any kind of compensation. HR needs to gather data on housing, transportation, healthcare, groceries, utilities etc. and use that data to adjust the salary’s purchasing power as the cost of living differs from city to city. Remember, the candidate will look to at least match their current standard of living with the new salary and will want their compensation to adequately cover all the expenses in the new city.   

Family Structure: Most relocation packages are focused on the financial aspects of the move. However, other factors such as care for the elderly & children’s education also heavily influence a candidate. Family interests pose crucial challenges and HR would do well to deal with them early on by asking a few key questions: Will the new city have social support structures that the candidate can rely on? Who will take care of their parents? Ask the candidate if they’ve been to the city before. As a hiring manager, you can help alleviate relocation concerns by being more flexible about the joining date or help them with finding the right school/college to tide things over.

Job relocation is a source of stress for the candidate. How the company handles the details will play a large part in determining what employees think about the experience down the road.

Read this before you decide to bite into the Forbidden Fruit – Counter Offer

Whatever the reasons were for wanting to change jobs, you would have analyzed them and finally made the decision to make a move to your next career opportunity. However when you plan to resign from your current job, you must be prepared to resist powerful, persuasive tactics which your employer can use to change your mind.

Your employer might lure you with more money, a promotion, or better benefits, and you might consider saying “Okay!” But is it a good idea???

Here are a few stats from 2 surveys Antal conducted on Counter Offers. In the first survey, Antal consultants spoke to those professionals who, after accepting the offer, went to resign with their current employers, were counter offered they accepted and the consequences they faced.

In the second survey, Antal Consultants spoke to HR Managers who have counter offered their employees to retain them. However, this is done to buy out some time to hire a replacement or very rarely it count be to retain the employee since certain skill sets are hard to find.

Here’s a detailed infographic you must have a look at before you think of biting into the ‘Forbidden Apple’ – Counter Offer

Please Note: Click on the image below for a better view 

Relocating for a Job? Here are a few things you need to consider

There are many factors that one needs to consider before looking for a job change or accepting a new job offer particularly when you have to relocate to a different city or country. Many a times candidates make these decision in haste or simply by being blinded by the five or six-figure salary that is being offered, but those numbers can be deceiving. There are many factors like cost of living, lifestyle, social support, education etc that one needs to consider. In a situation when you’re relocating for a job it’s not just your decision but also a decision that you must make with your spouse, family. Inspite of the salary hikes that come with relocation the reality is a little more complicated.

Here are 8 factors you and your spouse/parents need to consider before you relocate for a new job.

Salary: Negotiate your salary in such a way that you will not only be happy with the raise you get, but also comfortably cover the living expenses in the new city. Find out if any of your moving expenditure is tax deductible.

Spousal Income: Finding employment for the relocating employee’s spouse or partner can be difficult. It will be a while before they can find a job in the new city and you need to ensure that you have enough buffer to tide over financial difficulties until you do so.

Relocation Assistance: Moving homes is often a painful, messy and costly ordeal. Most companies offer relocation assistance to employees. Make sure your new job has this or at least ensure that your new salary will be able to cover for the expenses. If your employer doesn’t offer relocation assistance, ask for it.

Social Support: Moving to a newer city often means the lack of social support initially. For one, it could mean that your parents or spouse will be left back in the old city until you figure out if they should move with you too. Look up old friends and acquaintances through your contacts or Facebook and ask them out for coffee or lunch.

Current Home: If you have been living in a rented place, then give the owner a heads-up of when you are planning to move. If the move is going to be sudden, the owners might ask you to cough up like two month’s rent. If you own the house, paying EMIs for your home and rent in the city can be daunting. Then, do you give it out on rent or get a caretaker to maintain the house until you get back?

New Home: Explore the city and learn about its neighbourhoods. Before you find a place to live in, find out which areas are residential or commercial, are these areas dangerous and do they have the kind of facilities that you are looking for? Does the neighbourhood you are eyeing have a good smattering of grocery shops, schools, clinics, hospitals and malls?

Cost of Living Index Comparison: It is important to know how much you are going to spend in the new city so research housing, transport, healthcare and food prices in order to create a realistic budget. Is there public transport? Can you walk to your workplace or do you need a car? Calculate how much your new salary will affect your daily budget and your ability to save.

Education of children: One of the first things you need to check out before moving to a new city is about what kind of schools are present in the city and their distance from your new home.

 

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